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Thursday, October 3, 2013

Thursday Links are totally thinking outside the box

+“Business understands the concept of dealing with risk, and climate change is the mother of all risks that we’ll face this century.” The Carbon Disclosure Project releases its yearly list of the world leaders in business for reducing carbon emissions. This has been the thing I find most shocking about business leaders' responses to Climate Change. Many of them are in the business of managing risk, and yet they seem to have a bizarre blind spot to the "mother of all risks." Consequently, there are tons of ways to capitalize on the scramble for carbon reduction in the next 20 years.

+By 2030, more than 60 percent of the world's population will live in an urban settlement. In Africa alone, the growth in population will equal the entire current population of the United States. Investment in the cities of the world, especially in housing, food, water, and sanitation probably represent the greatest opportunity for the entrepreneurial spirit over the next few decades. This article presents this in fairly dour terms, but every time I read about another worker housing complex collapsing in India, I just think, What a great opportunity to make the world a better place by investing in better places for people to live. If so many people are going to be moving into cities in the next decades, why not invest in real estate to house them now?

+Atlantic has 10 trends that every one of you should pay attention to. Between every one of these lines is an entrepreneurial opportunity.  

+This is an excellent example of thinking outside the box! Deep City Method is a framework for urban planners to utilize the ground underneath cities to help power the city and grow in a more sustainable fashion.

+So, what do we do? How do we build our urban centers so that we are both climate resilient and able to keep up with our growing population? How can we engage our communities and urbanites while we build the green job economy that holds such promise? On rebuilding our cities and infrastructure to grow jobs and provide a resiliency to the coming climate and resource difficulties. Could not agree more.
"Many cities don't recognize the potential of the ground they are built on," says Li Huanqing just finished her PhD at the Environmental Economics
and Management Laboratory at EPFL. What she hopes to show is that, if they go about exploiting their subsurface smartly, the investment can help cities grow in a way that pays off in the long term.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-urban-cities-underground.html#jCp
"Many cities don't recognize the potential of the ground they are built on," says Li Huanqing just finished her PhD at the Environmental Economics
and Management Laboratory at EPFL. What she hopes to show is that, if they go about exploiting their subsurface smartly, the investment can help cities grow in a way that pays off in the long term.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-urban-cities-underground.html#jCp
"Many cities don't recognize the potential of the ground they are built on," says Li Huanqing just finished her PhD at the Environmental Economics
and Management Laboratory at EPFL. What she hopes to show is that, if they go about exploiting their subsurface smartly, the investment can help cities grow in a way that pays off in the long term.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-urban-cities-underground.html#jCp


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