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Friday, September 27, 2013

Friday Links is all about climate change

I may run a few pieces down the road explaining the science behind Climate Change, but at this point I will just assume that if you're reading these posts you don't need to be convinced of the reality of Climate Change. Here are some links about stuff people are doing around the world to combat its effects.

+But, to start: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has just issued its latest report on how much we're screwing ourselves the state of man-made Climate Change, and unsurprisingly things are looking really really really really bad.

+This one's for the Ladies! Ban issued a message to the IWECI Summit stressing the "central" role of women in combatting climate change and underscoring that the pursuit of gender equity and women's empowerment "is a powerful tool in the race to combat climate change" and key to improving land productivity, improving the availability of clean water, reducing energy poverty, and promoting climate-smart agriculture and low-carbon growth. United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki- Moon makes the case that women can take the lead on Climate Change policy.

+Environmental rag, Mongabay, argues that Climate Change mitigation is actually makes economic sense. This article mostly focuses on the costs of Climate Change, which is really just the tip of the iceberg, Retrofitting our homes, businesses, transportation, electric grid, power suppliers, and every other darn thing would be the economic equivalent of 3 World War II's and would give us the required boost to be able to settle into the post-capitalism, steady state economy that nature demands. Climate Change mitigation makes sense on practically every level, for the vast majority of people.

+Climate change is a collective responsibility that reaches far beyond the mandate of any one government. Perhaps it is the reality of this disempowerment that inhibits governments from acting on it. Combating climate change, however, can happen at the individual level, unlike many other areas such as health and education which rely on governance to exist. Action on climate change can exist both without government help and beyond it. This is not to excuse government from action, but rather to circumvent it – to act when government cannot or refuses to. This article from the Guardian basically sums up the whole reason I've changed the focus of this blog. Hopefully governments will turn around on these systemic issues and start to help, but the important thing is: we do not need to wait for them to act. We can act on our own, regardless of the policies or beliefs of our governments. In fact, I would argue we have an ethical duty to act on behalf of future generations, in spite of our governments' dragging feet. I'm glad to see this view expressed in a major news source.
Policymakers saw economic and environmental stability as mutually exclusive—you can only have one or the other. However, we are starting to see and feel that these two things are intrinsically connected. As a nation, the United States simply cannot afford to wait any longer to make a big change.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0925-reynolds-climate-policy-economics.html#JO8fV8gGOWFtST1B.99
Policymakers saw economic and environmental stability as mutually exclusive—you can only have one or the other. However, we are starting to see and feel that these two things are intrinsically connected. As a nation, the United States simply cannot afford to wait any longer to make a big change.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0925-reynolds-climate-policy-economics.html#JO8fV8gGOWFtST1B.99
Policymakers saw economic and environmental stability as mutually exclusive—you can only have one or the other. However, we are starting to see and feel that these two things are intrinsically connected. As a nation, the United States simply cannot afford to wait any longer to make a big change.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0925-reynolds-climate-policy-economics.html#JO8fV8gGOWFtST1B.99
Policymakers saw economic and environmental stability as mutually exclusive—you can only have one or the other. However, we are starting to see and feel that these two things are intrinsically connected. As a nation, the United States simply cannot afford to wait any longer to make a big change.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0925-reynolds-climate-policy-economics.html#JO8fV8gGOWFtST1B.99
Policymakers saw economic and environmental stability as mutually exclusive—you can only have one or the other. However, we are starting to see and feel that these two things are intrinsically connected. As a nation, the United States simply cannot afford to wait any longer to make a big change.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0925-reynolds-climate-policy-economics.html#JO8fV8gGOWFtST1B.99
Policymakers saw economic and environmental stability as mutually exclusive—you can only have one or the other. However, we are starting to see and feel that these two things are intrinsically connected. As a nation, the United States simply cannot afford to wait any longer to make a big change.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0925-reynolds-climate-policy-economics.html#JO8fV8gGOWFtST1B.99
Policymakers saw economic and environmental stability as mutually exclusive—you can only have one or the other. However, we are starting to see and feel that these two things are intrinsically connected. As a nation, the United States simply cannot afford to wait any longer to make a big change.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0925-reynolds-climate-policy-economics.html#JO8fV8gGOWFtST1B.99

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